Reflection on Xi’an

Our group’s most recent trip to Xi’an was a great opportunity to experience the  many historical sites the city has to offer. The most notable locations we visited were the terra cotta warriors, of course, along with the city wall and the Great Mosque of Xi’an.

The terra cotta warriors were truly a spectacle. Our tour guide, Dong, insisted that they were not the only remarkable historic landmark of Xi’an, but one cannot deny the global fame they have brought to the city since their discovery in the mid 1970s. The sheer scale of their production is unfathomable, especially given the fact that they are all unique models. Dong explained that the typical terra cotta warrior had a round face, high cheek bones, big lips, and single-eylids (just like him, he said!). Hearing the explanation about how the warriors were built to provide protection for the Qin Emperor in the afterlife made my mind harken back to times when I’ve studied ancient Egyptian history. It seems like these two ancient civilizations had remarkably similar theories in terms of the path of the spirit after one’s passing. And even today, many people in China burn offerings in the form of paper cuttings, what I now see to be something of a heavily watered-down version of the thousands of terra cotta warriors we saw.

The city wall was an unexpected joy for many of us on the trip. Dong informed us that it was a popular tourist activity to rent bikes and ride along the wall, and we did not hesitate at the chance! Besides the excitement of finally riding a bike again (something I haven’t done in probably a year) it was also a great opportunity to see the surrounding city. Dong told us about how the city usd to be contained by this wall in addition to a moat that runs along its outer border. In ancient times the bell tower would ring, signaling all the farmers out in the countryside to return to the city, and another bell when they should wake up and get to work. Since then, of course, the city has grown to a size that doesn’t permit such a small border. But I loved experiencing this historic site on two wheels, even if it was a bit of a touristy move.

Last was the Great Mosque of Xi’an. This was a remarkable place because of the juxtaposition of Chinese-style temples with Arabic text written on their signs. What stood out from this place was that the nature of Chinese religions is such that the synergy of multiple ideals and traditions is not only permitted, but is commonplace. The best part of the mosque was the fact that it was still active, meaning that we were able to see those (men) who chose to worship there on a daily basis. It was also the most quiet and serene place we visited on our entire trip in Xi’an, which was a great chance to catch our breath after a wonderfully full day in the city.

 

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