Mutianyu Great Wall

The Great Wall of China is an architectural masterpiece, coming into creation as early as 220 BC through the leadership of Qin Shi Huang. The wall was originally created in order to protect China from foreign invaders along the northern borders in an east to west direction. Despite this seemingly unbreakable wall, the original wall has eroded over the centuries as it was originally made with earth, stones, and wood, and thus was restructured during the Ming Dynasty. The wall stems 13,171 miles in total and is still one of the world’s major wonders.

Although I had previously visited the Great Wall, my second visit did not fail to astound me – especially since we visited the Mutianyu section, which I had previously not been to. There was just so much history and culture embedded within those stones, and you could still feel the resolute and unwavering power of the Chinese. China is known for having one of the most detailed and longest histories, and through our visit it was very clear that the sheer force of China’s history was embedded within the millions of bricks and stones.

We took a cable car up towards a higher elevated part of the wall, and once we arrived at the top, we had two hours to explore the entire section (figure 1, 2). While initially I believed two hours was far too long, it was just the right amount of time. The sky was clear of any clouds, and the temperature was absolutely perfect (warm enough to traverse around without a coat). Traversing the wall itself was quite a challenge – numerous stones were out of place, other tourists were everywhere trying to get through the small entryways, and there were thousands upon thousands of stairs. While I was completely out of breath (due to the stairs), I was able to take a moment to appreciate the sheer force of history that I was climbing across – the amount of physical labor with limited technology, the planning, the execution, the representation of China as a solitary unit standing strong after centuries – it’s all quite incredible to think about. Once I had made it to the top, all the hard work paid off with the incredible view of the wall, the mountains, and the scenery (figure 3).

Though most of us had already visited the Great Wall, I think we were all still in awe by how incredible it was. There is really nothing that can compare to it, and it was one of the few times where I could look past the extreme modernization in the cities and actually see how China has become a leading force in today’s society.

 

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